Choral Reviews

Review by Jean R. Boehler: "Great Creator"

Karen Marrolli has written and composed this simple yet profound piece. It begins with unison singing, accompanied by the piano in the treble range, and eventually changes to three or four parts that are intuitive and could be learned easily. The piano accompaniment is well crafted with its independent voicing yet will guide the singers through the piece. The Advent text is a prayer to our Great Creator as we wait and plead for the glorious rebirth when the lion will lie down with the lamb. The piece ends reflectively as we pray, "use our hearts and hands in service; sculpt your kingdom here on earth."

CROSSACCENT          Volume 26, No 2      Summer 2018

 

Review by Timothy Michael Powell: "O Dayspring" 

Karen Marrolli (1975: 2014) Text: Karen Marrolli and J. M. Neale (1818-1866: 1851) SATB, piano (3:00) MorningStar MSM-50-0150 

Continuing with the theme of planning appropriate music for Advent and Christmas in mid-summer, Karen Marrolli’s "O Dayspring" incorporates fragments of the music and the English translation from Veni Emmanuel with newly written text and music. Marrolli opens with a violin (fiddle) solo on the chant, which appears in descant to the voices and also echoes Marrolli’s new melody. The use of tasteful “hammer-like” grace notes in the violin, occasional glimpses of dorian mode, and open harmonies in the keyboard lend the piece a Celtic feel. 

The piece grows in intensity throughout and is particularly effective when “death dark shadows put to flight” tickles the ear with brief dissonance before launching into a strong choral unison on the final stanza. 

The vocal range is limited, making this piece extremely accessible to the church ensemble. The quality of the writing, however, provides accomplished choirs a solid addition to the repertoire. Similarly, the violin solo is easily playable by beginning musicians but could easily act as a template for more extensive improvisation and ornamentation by an accomplished professional. The allusion to Veni Emmanuel—it is never sung by the voices—is a welcome artistic choice. Providing a slight hint of the familiar serves to highlight the new text and tune, while placing it all solidly within the liturgical season.

CHORAL JOURNAL Volume 58 Number 1    A Focus on Music in Worship 

Singer-Songwriter Press

"...Profound, cerebral, and creative..." Rick Jamm, Jamsphere.com

"Her voice is deep and rich, with strains of Mary Chapin Carpenter and Joan Armatrading, and her songs are devotional, though more spiritual than specifically religious in nature." Jennifer Levin, Pasatiempo (in the Santa Fe New Mexican)

"Marrolli’s voi
ce is a rare and beautiful bird: vibrato-charged, richly contralto and choral in nature." Ted E. Lovato, The Santa Fe Reporter (May 2015)

Praise for Twilight Songs: "...As the title suggests, this is lush, starry-eyed stuff that packs enough melody and romantic energy to soothe even the most savage of beasts." 
Ted E. Lovato, The Santa Fe Reporter (May 2015)

"Karen's strong folk roots give this album a distinguished flair you won't find anywhere else in the last or the next decade -- if not somewhere between legendary artists like Joan Baez and Tori Amos. She is melancholy, she is hopeful, yet absolutely her own, a complete and fulfilled human being who can't help but keep marching on, no matter what." Rick Jamm, Jamsphere.com

From a fan: "'Cathedrals is very powerful, 'Woman' is my kind of lady, and 'Run to You' is one of my favorites too. I support what you have to say and how you sing the words. They truly come from within you. Keep on evolving, Karen, you have so very much to say."